technology_applications

Applications

Protein Interaction Studies and Ligand Binding Assays
ORLA Technology is directly applicable to measurement techniques such as Surface Plasmon Resonance, used for studying protein-protein interactions. It provides a unique way to create protein interaction layers with design at the nanoscale. Hence, we can bring an immense number of different products of molecular biology to the interface rapidly, in large amounts and under controlled conditions.

The technology can also be used to create diagnostic assays requiring the precise immobilisation of biological components e.g. antibodies or antigens. The low non-specific binding and precision engineering of the surfaces make them ideally suited to robust, sensitive assay formats.

Schematic Example
Functional Proteins immobilised at the surface with nanoscale precision in a monolayer.

Applications

Protein Interaction Studies and Ligand Binding Assays

ORLA Technology is directly applicable to measurement techniques such as Surface Plasmon Resonance, used for studying protein-protein interactions. It provides a unique way to create protein interaction layers with design at the nanoscale. Hence, we can bring an immense number of different products of molecular biology to the interface rapidly, in large amounts and under controlled conditions.

The technology can also be used to create diagnostic assays requiring the precise immobilisation of biological components e.g. antibodies or antigens. The low non-specific binding and precision engineering of the surfaces make them ideally suited to robust, sensitive assay formats.Schematic Example
Functional Proteins immobilised at the surface with nanoscale precision in a monolayer.

Due to the low non-specific interactions binding only occurs where desired.Orla Technology is compatible with a number of detection methods including optical (e.g. Surface Plasmon Resonance), electrical (e.g. Impedance Spectroscopy) or Mass (e.g. Quartz Crystal Microbalance).

Precision Immobilsation of Functional Proteins e.g. Enzymes
Certain applications e.g. biosensors, implants and catalysis will require the precise immobilization of a functional protein at a surface. Orla technology can provide the functionality in a robust and easily manufactured format.

Schematic Example:


Applications

Protein Interaction Studies and Ligand Binding Assays

ORLA Technology is directly applicable to measurement techniques such as Surface Plasmon Resonance, used for studying protein-protein interactions. It provides a unique way to create protein interaction layers with design at the nanoscale. Hence, we can bring an immense number of different products of molecular biology to the interface rapidly, in large amounts and under controlled conditions.

The technology can also be used to create diagnostic assays requiring the precise immobilisation of biological components e.g. antibodies or antigens. The low non-specific binding and precision engineering of the surfaces make them ideally suited to robust, sensitive assay formats.
Schematic Example
Functional Proteins immobilised at the surface with nanoscale precision in a monolayer.


Due to the low non-specific interactions binding only occurs where desired.
Orla Technology is compatible with a number of detection methods including optical (e.g. Surface Plasmon Resonance), electrical (e.g. Impedance Spectroscopy) or Mass (e.g. Quartz Crystal Microbalance).

Precision Immobilsation of Functional Proteins e.g. Enzymes
Certain applications e.g. biosensors, implants and catalysis will require the precise immobilization of a functional protein at a surface. Orla technology can provide the functionality in a robust and easily manufactured format.

Schematic Example:
Bioselective Surfaces for Cell Attachment
There is a need for surfaces upon which cells will behave as though in complex tissues and thus provide a relevant in vitro model of cellular processes. This has clear advantages in replacing animal models of disease, target validation, and toxicology. Unlike topographically patterned inorganic matrices, hydrophilic polymers or self-assembled alkyl monolayers, ORLA arrays allow presentation of binding proteins in a ‘natural’, unconstrained state. Such surfaces could also be used for cell purification, or isolation of sparse cell populations.
Schematic Example